Deane went on a weekend mission with his Cactus Henry and here's what he has to say about it:


A backpack is an essential biking tool. Some prefer to ride without but I like containing everything I need for a 2-6 hour ride in one place. I like the crash protection to my back, effectively cradling my spine. A chance visit to the Cactus showroom introduced me to the Henry. It's a traditional looking backpack, on first look I dismissed it as being too big for a day pack. I tried it on and was immediately impressed with the fit. 

 

It doesn't have gadgety features found on most biking backpacks. No fancy media pocket, no helmet harness and only 1 zip (normally the first thing to fail when full of mud and salty sweat). One cavernous compartment, which I didn't manage to fill on an overnight ride and a pocket in the lid for easy to get items. The Henry is very light, 480g, makes it appealing  for runners and adventure racers too. Lightweight materials make this possible but during testing in wet conditions everything stayed dry, this may change after more wear, we'll see...

 

The outstanding feature of this pack is the harness. From a heritage of packs designed for ski patrollers and heavy duty west coast bush bashing, it's safe to say Cactus know how to make a pack fit snug to your back. A secure waist and sternum strap kept the bag from flopping round and holds my hydration hose close for easy access. It has a hydration sleeve to keep your bladder separate to your gear and a hidden opening in the lid for the hose to come out of. 

 

It's not easy to replace equipment that has been faithful companions on many missions, my previous day pack was one of these items. With the advent of sophisticated bikepacking bags, strapped to the bike, it is now possible to have a bag that doubles for day trip and multi day trips. The Henry is ideal for this purpose, small enough to cinch down for a quick blast in the hills and big enough to load up for an extended bikepacking trip in the backcountry. 


Check out the Henry here. To check out more of Deane's adventures, check out his website here